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100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

terça-feira, 20 de julho de 2010

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

Read more...

100 anos de Japão no Brasil: O que aprendemos com os japoneses?

100 years of Japan in Brazil: What we learned from the Japanese?

Do you like peanut Japanese? E Noodles? He loves salad seasoned with soy sauce or a warm pastel fair? Learned mathematics with the Kumon method and practice judo? So you're just one of thousands of Brazilians who have become accustomed to many of the small things that the Japanese have brought to our lives.

Since their arrival here in 1908, the Japanese have spread across the country. Although many families to cluster in colonies (as in Sao Paulo and Parana), after 100 years of immigration, there are Japanese families living in the north to the south. Gradually they were merging with Brazilian and thus formed nipo-Brazilian families.

During this hundred years, the Japanese have taught us to live with their customs. Words such as shiatsu, mats, karate, karaoke and many others have been incorporated into the Brazilian lexicon.

More than simply adding new words, the Japanese added new flavors in Brazilian cuisine, which led to words such as khaki, Caboche tofu and finally enter the dictionaries, recipe books and menus here. That's because they were the immigrants, who brought to Brazil the sweet persimmon (for here there was only one version astringent fruit, the kind that "ties the mouth"), pumpkin-type Caboche (that we use to make candy) and Fuji apple (the name delivery right? arrived here in 1971). The tangerine, mandarin fruit is almost a "nikkei": it is the result of grafting a kind of tangerine in a Japanese lemon tree of Brazil.

On the beach of spices and delicacies, the Japanese have taught us to love black pepper kingdom (brought by a chief of boat docked here in 1933), the horseradish (a green paste used to taste with raw fish) and Aji- no-moto (seasoning that enhances the flavor of food is typically Japanese). Not forgetting, of course, the soy sauce, Japanese soy sauce on the tables Brazilian indispensable.

But they were not only fruits and salads that we learn to eat with the Japanese. With them we learn to like dehydrated foods in boiling water three minutes and are ready and tasty (nothing more practical), also learned to eat with two sticks (the "chopsticks", which often end up in the hair of Brazil) and tea green (weight loss, mostly).

We can not deny that in one hundred years, the Japanese could put your brand in Brazil. By city name of Japanese origin there: the city of Assai, Parana, was practically founded by immigrants who named with the version "aportuguesamento" of "Asahi", which in Japanese means "rising sun".

The heron "Tsuru": Origamis are taught even in schools in Brazil.
So no matter if you never bathed in a hot tub, it never made an origami paper or you do not have a tattoo "kanji." What matters is that in 100 years, the Japanese who came to Brazil managed to teach a little of their culture to the Brazilians and, thus, showed us a great lesson: they have never ceased to be Japanese, despite being so far from your country.

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